International Association of Scientific and Technological University Libraries

IATUL News Alerts

Archive October 2013

IATUL Leadership Academy in Bangkok

Wednesday, 30 October 2013 11:04:38 a.m.

Library Directors and Associate Directors from the region are invited to attend the IATUL Leadership Academy, which will be held at the Windsor Hotel in Bangkok, 10 – 11 February 2014.

Professor Dr Claudia Peus and staff from the Executive Education Centre at Technische Universität München, supported by three experienced IATUL Library Directors, will conduct discussion sessions, provide management training and best practice examples specifically designed for a group of twenty Directors and Associate Directors.

Applications are invited from IATUL members and non-members. Non-members are encouraged to take up the offer of a one-year free IATUL membership which will be converted into an ordinary membership thereafter.

The registration fee is €500.
UNESCO Scale of Assessment Band 2 countries may apply to the IATUL Office for reduction of this fee.
 
For more information please visit the workshop website.

Results of the consultation on Open Research Data

Wednesday, 30 October 2013 11:01:45 a.m.

Open enquiry is at the heart of scientific endeavour, and rapid technological change has profound implications for the way in which science is conducted and communicated. Research is being transformed in particular by the increasing availability of digital data and new technologies for gathering, processing and generating digital resources.

In the Communication 'Towards better access to scientific information', the Commission announces that it will 'provide a framework and encourage open access to research data in Horizon 2020, taking into account any restrictions that may be needed in order to protect intellectual property or legitimate commercial interests'.
 
On 2nd of July 2013, the EC held a one-day public consultation on open research data in Brussels to obtain the input of all concerned stakeholders on this important and sensitive issue. Attendees included stakeholders from the research and publishing communities, as well as libraries, universities and industry representatives. The outcomes of the consultation will help the Commission to develop its policies on open research data.
 
 
Go to source: http://ec.europa.eu/digital-agenda/node/67533

The death of the academic book and the path to Open Access

Wednesday, 30 October 2013 11:00:10 a.m.

Is publishing academic books a dying trade? And if so, are free e-books from universities likely to deal the final blow?
 
The future of book publishing in general is hotly contested, but particularly so for university presses. Louise Adler, the head of Melbourne University Publishing recently suggested that the book industry is failing and university presses publishing “Open Access” – or free, reproducible – books are second rate publications which threaten intellectual property rights.
 
Go to source:

http://theconversation.com/the-death-of-the-academic-book-and-the-path-to-open-access-19153

Mainstreaming Special Collections: Research Libraries Issues

Wednesday, 30 October 2013 10:58:18 a.m.

ARL has published a special issue on aligning, integrating, and mainstreaming special collections into broader library operations, guest edited by ARL visiting program officer Lisa Carter of the Ohio State University.
 
This issue of RLI includes six case studies from ARL member libraries that are incorporating special collections more holistically into library initiatives. The cases were selected by the ARL Working Group on Transforming Special Collections in the Digital Age after issuing a call for proposals in 2012. In an introduction to the issue, Lisa Carter provides an overview of themes that emerged from the case study submissions and she identifies areas for further investigation.
 
Go to source:
http://www.arl.org/news/arl-news/2952-mainstreaming-special-collections-arl-releases-rli-283

Fit for Purpose: Developing Business Cases for New Services in Research Libraries

Wednesday, 30 October 2013 10:56:26 a.m.

Fit for Purpose is a collaborative research project that will recommend methods for effective business planning in research libraries. It recognizes first that there are opportunities for research libraries to respond to the turbulence in scholarly communications and a potential role in the management of the data supporting scholarly research. But these opportunities raise the risks of acting with limited knowledge of the longer-term costs of developing and sustaining new services. The goal of the project is to present a structured, disciplined approach for making decisions about creating and maintaining new services in research libraries. The structure described in the project output provides tools with which to determine whether and how to create a new service.
 
The concept “Fit for Purpose” evolved out of the team’s desire to put the new services into a framework that encourages the challenge of fundamental assumptions. In that spirit, the content of the core article recommendations will encourage professionals to rigorously review the suitability of a proposed service in terms of alignment with institutional mission and sustainability. In short, to examine whether a proposed new service is fit for purpose within its context.
 
During Phase I of the project the team is producing a core article containing a literature review and recommendations. The review of the library, business, and non-profit literatures elicits possible models upon which to build a toolkit that is consistent with research library environments and values. The authors borrow from these to provide recommendations for analyzing organizational readiness, business case development, piloting new services, and monitoring sustainability through the business planning lifecycle. The core article will be released for public comment to provide further input into the model and to request suggestions for case study subjects.
 
Phase II consists of a series of case studies inspired by the recommendations. Project participants will conduct case studies of services being offered by research libraries or sponsored by libraries in collaboration with affiliated institutions. The case studies will provide the team with an opportunity to explore the planning process and related concepts with practitioners. Based on these case studies, the team will review and revise the initial finding to identify best practices for navigating the inherent uncertainty of developing sustainable services.
 
Go to source: http://mcpress.media-commons.org/businesscases/

Openness to Textbook Alternatives is Growing | From the Bell Tower

Wednesday, 30 October 2013 10:54:50 a.m.

Both the higher education and mainstream media tend to report on studies relating college students’ lack of openness to non-print textbooks. More research and experimentation in this area suggest student attitudes may be starting to change.
 
The return of the fall semester brought with it the usual barrage of student questions about textbook availability. Student after student marched to the reference desk in search of a textbook. For some, even an outdated edition would do. For many more, unfortunately, the search was futile. Academic libraries, they discovered, make a poor substitute for the campus bookstore. The high cost of commercial textbooks is a perennial source of financial pain for college students. The question is what can we do about it, and by “we” I mean academic librarians. I’ve previously shared some ideas for strategies that might be employed to offer free or no-cost learning material options for students. This might include the use of open educational resources or licensed library content. One argument in support of print textbooks is that students prefer it for reading and study. Student resistance to digital texts is shifting, and that could bode well for the acceleration of textbook alternatives.
 
 
Go to source:

http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2013/10/opinion/steven-bell/openness-to-textbooks-alternatives-is-growing-from-the-bell-tower/

The advantage of APIs

Wednesday, 30 October 2013 10:51:26 a.m.

By enabling data sharing between internal IT systems and between one organisation and another, APIs facilitate not only the dissemination of knowledge but also the design of innovative online services for students and staff.

By removing the need to repeat laborious data entry tasks, they save staff time and increase organisational efficiency.
 
APIs facilitate not only the dissemination of knowledge but also the design of innovative online services for students and staff.
 
This report explains these and other key benefits of APIs, demonstrates these benefits with case studies and contextualised examples, and suggests some steps to start using APIs both as a technology and as a business change methodology. The aim throughout is to highlight the key opportunities and challenges facing UK further and higher education organisations in achieving good practice for implementing APIs, and to provide real world case studies and actionable advice as to how to use APIs to further typical institutional goals. The writing is non-technical and is aimed at senior university and college managers.
 
 
Go to source: http://www.jisc.ac.uk/reports/the-advantage-of-apis

Science, Publishing, and Digital Libraries (Again)

Wednesday, 30 October 2013 10:49:21 a.m.

The five articles in our September/October issue were all presented at the 2nd International Workshop on Mining Scientific Publications, which was held in conjunction with JCDL 2013. We published a similar issue in 2012, which was well received, and are pleased to follow up with another set. Again, the articles cover a range of topics. Our guest editors, Knoth, Zdrahal, Freire, and Muhr, provide a brief introduction to the individual articles and to the issue as a whole and divide the articles into two categories: metadata extraction from articles and analysis of publication patterns to illuminate certain aspects of the larger research environment. We also have a conference report from Open Repositories 2013, which fits fairly nicely with the rest of the issue, as the theme of that conference, 'Use, Reuse, Reproduce' also addresses the topic that seems to be everywhere — the urgency of finding new approaches and new roles for existing players in the conduct of science as it relates to data collection and archiving, data use and reuse, and scientific publication.

 
Go to source: http://www.dlib.org/

IATUL Leadership Academy in Bangkok

Tuesday, 1 October 2013 4:40:38 p.m.

Library Directors and Associate Directors are invited to attend the IATUL Leadership Academy, a workshop, which will be held at Windsor Hotel in Bangkok, 10 – 11 February 2014.

 
Professor Dr Claudia Peus and staff from the Executive Education Centre at Technische Universität München, supported by three experienced IATUL Library Directors, will conduct discussion sessions, provide management training and best practice examples specifically designed for a group of twenty Directors and Associate Directors.
 
Applications are invited from IATUL members and non-members. Non-members are encouraged to take up the offer of a one-year free IATUL membership which will be converted into an ordinary membership thereafter.
 
The registration fee is €500. UNESCO Scale of Assessment Band 2 countries may apply to the IATUL Office for reduction of this fee.
 
For more information please visit the workshop website.

Archive