International Association of Scientific and Technological University Libraries

IATUL News Alerts

Archive May 2012

Purdue Librariesí Dean James Mullins Honored by ARL

Monday, 14 May 2012 2:23:31 p.m.

On April 4, the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) honored Dean James Mullins and the Purdue University Libraries for their enduring commitment to ARL’s Initiative to Recruit a Diverse Workforce (IRDW), and for advancing the cause of diversity and inclusion in academic and research libraries. Since 2005, Dean Mullins and the Purdue Libraries have hosted IRDW Diversity Scholars at an annual “research library visit” designed to provide an inside look at operations in a major research library in the Midwest. During the closing reception for the eighth visit, held at the Purdue Black Cultural Center, Dean Mullins was presented an engraved trophy in recognition of this continued dedication to hosting the site visit.

Congratulations to IATUL Board member Jim Mullins!

Go to source: http://www.arl.org/news/pr/Mullins-11may12.shtml

Wikipedia founder to help in government's research scheme

Friday, 4 May 2012 9:52:53 a.m.

Academic spring campaign aims to make all taxpayer-funded academic research available for free online.
 
The UK government has drafted in the Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales to help make all taxpayer-funded academic research in Britain available online to anyone who wants to read or use it.
 
The initiative, which has the backing of No 10 and should be up and running in two years, will be announced by the universities and science minister, David Willetts, in a speech to the Publishers Association on Wednesday.
The move will embolden what has been dubbed the "academic spring" – a growing campaign among academics and research funders for open access in academic publishing. They want to unlock the results of research from behind the lucrative paywalls of journals controlled by publishing companies.

Go to source:

Policy guidelines for the development and promotion of open access

Friday, 4 May 2012 9:17:52 a.m.

UNESCO issued this publication to demystify the concept of Open Access (OA) and to provide concrete steps on putting relevant policies in place. Building capacities in Member States for Open Access is a necessary but not sufficient condition for promotion of the concept. Creating an enabling policy environment for OA is therefore a priority.
 
This publication will serve the needs of OA policy development at the government, institutional and funding agency level. The overall objective of the Policy Guidelines is to promote Open Access in Member States by facilitating understanding of all relevant issues related to Open Access. 
The guidelines are not prescriptive in nature, but are suggestive to facilitate knowledge-based decision-making to adopt OA policies and strengthen national research systems.
 
Written by Dr. Alma Swan, an eminent expert in the field of Open Access, the draft went through an open consultation and peer review at the Open Access Community in the WSIS Knowledge Communities. 
 
The Policy Guidelines can be used by individuals as a basic text on Open Access and related policies. The publication will be useful to both the beginners as well as experienced in the world of Open Access, and will assist the decision-makers, administrators and research managers to focus on OA policy development.

Go to source:

http://www.unesco.org/new/en/communication-and-information/resources/publications-and-communication-materials/publications/full-list/policy-guidelines-for-the-development-and-promotion-of-open-access/

Library Publishing Services: Strategies for Success: Final Research Report

Friday, 4 May 2012 9:17:52 a.m.

This report briefly presents the findings and recommendations of the "Library Publishing Services: Strategies for Success" project which investigated the extent to which publishing has now become a core activity of North American academic libraries and suggested ways in which further capacity could be built. The research described (consisting of a survey, some case studies, three workshops, and a set of further reading recommendations) was mainly conducted between October 1, 2010, and September 30, 2011. It was supported by a grant from the Institute for Museum and Libraries Studies, made to Purdue University Libraries in collaboration with the Libraries of the Georgia Institute of Technology and the J. Willard Marriott Library at the University of Utah.

 
Go to source: http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/purduepress_ebooks/24/

JISC Inform 33

Friday, 4 May 2012 9:17:52 a.m.

The Spring edition of JISC Inform looks at how tech-enabled universities and colleges in the UK are embracing the web to showcase their expertise and work smarter.

Go to source:
http://www.jisc.ac.uk/publications/jiscinform/2012/inform33.aspx

Clarifying the Roles of Libraries in Research Data Management: A Discussion Day to find Creative Solutions

Friday, 4 May 2012 9:17:52 a.m.

The purpose of the day was to clarify the research library agenda with regard to research data management, and to establish where RLUK can add value to the process through collaborative action. The session was facilitated by Kevin Ashley, Director of the Digital Curation Centre, and took the form of a mixture of presentations and working sessions. The presentations were by David Carr of the Wellcome Trust on Why good RDM is important to the institution; Sheila Corrall of the University of Sheffield on library staff development issues, Simon Hodson of the JISC on The skills that researchers may expect librarians to have, and Martin Lewis of the University of Sheffield on Working with other institutional actors.
 
Go to source:
http://www.rluk.ac.uk/content/clarifying-roles-libraries-research-data-management-discussion-day-find-creative-solutions

Taking Steps Toward ďInteractive Learning Online"

Friday, 4 May 2012 9:17:52 a.m.

Extraordinary pressure is mounting on colleges and universities—especially public universities—to address the ever-increasing growth in the costs of higher education and to improve student learning outcomes. Online learning holds great promise to address these issues, but requires these institutions to operate in substantially different ways. “Barriers to Adoption of Online Learning Systems in US Higher Education,” an Ithaka S+R report released today and funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, highlights the challenges to be overcome by institutions so that they can take advantage of online learning technologies, and explores why highly interactive online systems have yet to take hold in any substantial way. 
The report summarizes and provides analysis based on the experience and impressions of senior administrators and deans from a range of institutions including research universities, small colleges, and community colleges. These impressions were gathered through interviews conducted largely by Lawrence Bacow and William Bowen, Ithaka S+R senior advisors, and Kevin Guthrie, ITHAKA’s president.  

Go to source:
http://www.ithaka.org/about-ithaka/announcements/barriers-to-adoption-of-online-learning-systems-in-u-s-higher-education

If Harvard Canít Afford Academic Journal Subscriptions, Maybe Itís Time for an Open Access Model

Friday, 4 May 2012 9:17:52 a.m.

Last week, Harvard’s Faculty Advisory Council revealed that the school now spends $3.75 million annually on academic journal subscriptions. Why so much? According to a memo the council sent out, some journals cost the school up to $40,000 every year, with the two top publishers increasing the price of content 145% over the last six years.
This is troubling for a number of reasons. First, in an age where the public can browse nearly 4 million articles for free on Wikipedia, a curious person looking to read up on the latest scientific research can expect to spend nearly $30 to $40 for a single paper from publishers such as Elsevier and Springer.
While it would be nice if academic journals were affordable for the general public, they are an absolute necessity for university faculty and graduate students. Like your cable provider, publishers often sell content in huge bundles, packing in less desirable content with the good stuff and raising the price.

Go to source:
http://techland.time.com/2012/04/26/if-harvard-cant-afford-academic-journal-subscriptions-maybe-its-time-for-an-open-access-model/#ixzz1taWovq3A



 

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